It's easy to see why Toyah feels that her latest major movie role is the most accomplished acting performance of her varied career. 

For the flame-haired singer stars with Roger Daltrey in Murder - The Ultimate Grounds for Divorce, and her part could not be further from the real life Miss Willcox. 

In the film Toyah plays a downtrodden housewife whose boring day-to-day existence becomes the centrepiece of a murder plot 

BIZARRE 

But the 25-year-old star's bizarre lifestyle is nothing like the script. After an 18-month period in which se concentrated solely on her acting, Toyah is once again racing up the pop charts with her new single Don't Fall in Love. 

In June, she also releases her first album - called Minx - for over a year. 

Her phenomenal success in both fields has not only brought international acclaim for the singer hailed as the " Punk Priestess of  the 80s" but also the need for Toyah to become a very strict businesswoman. 

RETREATS

She controls a staff of managers, publicists and accountants who help administer her many business interests. 

And away from her work, Toyah retreats into a cosy Victorian house in London with her long-term boyfriend Tom. 

Although she likes to keep her private life just like that, Toyah revealed for the first time that her commitment to her career has given her an unconventional outlook on love, marriage and motherhood. 

"My house is a fortress for Tom and me to protect ourselves from the outside world," Toyah told me. 

"We've been together now for five years and each day gets better - we get closer and more inseparable all the time." 

"But I couldn't bear having a child and becoming a mother at this moment in time, because I'm far too selfish." 

"I have to be alone a helluva lot, and I wouldn't have the patience to have a child constantly coming to me for help - I'm not  ready yet for that." 

"I'd like to have a child some day - but as late as possible in my career. I also think that I'd be a good mother, because I'm very good at adapting." 

"It's ironic in a way that I play the role of a housewife in the film, because I just couldn't cope with that kind of life." 

While Tom earns money doing studio session work as a guitarist, Toyah concentrates on her music, designs and acting. 

She is also clearly fond of Tom - but the pair have no immediate plans to marry, and Toyah's attitude to love 
is again highly individual. 

"If another woman came into Tom's life, I wouldn't fight to keep him." 

"There's no way I'd battle with another woman overa man." 

"My life with him is built on faithfulness, and I've told him that once that bond is broken we'll no longer be together." 

"I'm not interested at all in having affairs myself." 

"But if a man is unfaithful to a woman and he keeps hanging around, he's not worth having - I wouldn't share a man of mine with anyone." 

Now Toyah intends to spend the next few months re-establishing her successful pop career - but she's already thinking a long way into the future and has definite career plans. 

"I think I need 15 really hard working years before I reach a standard of acting I'll be really happy with." she said. 

"I don't think I'll really achieve the artistic performances I'm striving for until I'm about 40." 

"People have concentrated too much on my punky image in the past and not enough on my music - it's now 
time to correct that." 

Toyah has recently made some sweeping changes in her personal  life. She's become a vegetarian, gone completely teetotal, and works out regularly in a gymnasium in her home to keep her in perfect shape. 

"I'm getting older so I want to consciously take care of my body," she said. "I was drinking just to be social - some days I was putting away a bottle of Bacardi through boredom and then lying down drunk." 

"So I just decided to revolutionize my life - I stopped, and have never looked back." 

"I don't need drugs either - I've never taken any, and don't intend to start. I also won't tolerate people who work for me taking drugs. If they do it in front of me, I won't have them around."

Daily Record, 1985